lgorman

Image
lgorman@arizona.edu
Phone
520-626-0786
Office
Modern Languages 525
Office Hours
Tuesday, 9-10am and by appointment, via Zoom https://arizona.zoom.us/j/8079121812
Gorman, Lillian
Assistant Professor

Dr. Lillian Gorman is an Assistant Professor of Spanish Sociolinguistics and U.S. Latina/o/x Cultural Studies and the Director of the Spanish as a Heritage Language Program in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese. She is also affiliated faculty in the Second Language Teaching and Acquisition (SLAT) and Social, Cultural, and Critical Theory (SCCT) Graduate Interdiscipilinary programs.  Her research interests center around issues of language and identity within U.S. Latina/o/x communities and in U.S. Latina/o/x popular culture. Her interdisciplinary work also focuses on heritage language pedagogy and its intersections with bilingual education.  Her essays have appeared in the edited volumes Transnational Encounters:  Music and Performance at the U.S. Mexico Border, Bilingual Youth: Spanish in English Speaking Societies, Explorations in Ethnography, Language and Communication: Capturing Linguistic and Cultural Diversities, and Querencia:  Reflections on the New Mexico Homeland.  She was recently awarded the University of New Mexico Center for Regional Studies Semester Scholar-in-Residence Award (2020) and the University of Arizona Hispanic Serving Institutions Fellowship (2019-2020).      

She graduated with a B.A. in Spanish and an M.A. in Southwest Hispanic Studies from the University of New Mexico where she was part of the university’s first class of Ronald E. McNair Scholars.  She graduated with her Ph.D. from the University of Illinois at Chicago in Hispanic Studies with concentrations in Latina/o cultural studies and sociolinguistics and also served as the Assistant Director for UIC’s Spanish for Heritage Speakers Program.  She has worked in the field of Spanish as a Heritage Language for 19 years.  She previously developed and directed the Spanish as a Heritage Language Program and the Spanish for Heritage Learners Nicaragua Summer Immersion Program at New Mexico Highlands University. She has also served as faculty for the Summer Spanish Immersion Program for Bilingual Teachers at New Mexico Highlands University from 2006-2019.  She actively promotes recruitment and retention of Latinas/os/xs in higher education and has worked with local and national Latino higher education organizations such as the USDA Hispanic Serving Institutions Office, HACU and the Tucson Hispanic Leadership Institute.  Dr. Lillian Gorman is a proud Chicana and Nuevomexicana from Albuquerque, New Mexico.   

COURSES TAUGHT:

SPAN 103: Oral Skills for Heritage Learners of Spanish

SPAN 253: Intermediate Spanish I for Heritage Learners

SPAN 333:  Advanced Spanish for Heritage Learners

SPAN 150B2 GNED: The Politics of Language- U.S. Latinos, Language and Society

SPAN 449D: Topics in Border Studies- Las líneas fronterizas de los latinos en los Estados Unidos (U.S. Latina/o/x Cultural and Linguistic Borderlands)

SPAN 457: Applied Linguistics

SPAN 574A: Language in the Mexican-American Experience

SPAN 574B:  Heritage Language Research

SPAN 581B: Heritage Language Pedagogy

 

 

Currently Teaching

SPAN 599 – Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work. Graduate students doing independent work which cannot be classified as actual research will register for credit under course number 599, 699, or 799.

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work. Graduate students doing independent work which cannot be classified as actual research will register for credit under course number 599, 699, or 799.

SPAN 920 – Dissertation

Research for the doctoral dissertation (whether library research, laboratory or field observation or research, artistic creation, or dissertation writing).

Research for the doctoral dissertation (whether library research, laboratory or field observation or research, artistic creation, or dissertation writing).

SPAN 150B1 – Latina/o Stories

This course introduces students to the nationally, linguistically, geographically, culturally, and ethnically diverse Latina/o experience in the United States through exploring Latina/o stories. Students will analyze a wide variety of cultural texts including short stories, poems, novels, films, and television in order to examine the transnational heritages embedded within the broad category encompassed by the term "Latina/o" and discuss how this heritage impacts Latina/o culture specifically and the United States in general today. These texts explore a wide-range of themes, from race relations to migrant identities to gender norms, in a variety of contexts including family, education, politics, and popular culture.

This course introduces students to the nationally, linguistically, geographically, culturally, and ethnically diverse Latina/o experience in the United States through exploring Latina/o stories. Students will analyze a wide variety of cultural texts including short stories, poems, novels, films, and television in order to examine the transnational heritages embedded within the broad category encompassed by the term "Latina/o" and discuss how this heritage impacts Latina/o culture specifically and the United States in general today. These texts explore a wide-range of themes, from race relations to migrant identities to gender norms, in a variety of contexts including family, education, politics, and popular culture.

This course introduces students to the nationally, linguistically, geographically, culturally, and ethnically diverse Latina/o experience in the United States through exploring Latina/o stories. Students will analyze a wide variety of cultural texts including short stories, poems, novels, films, and television in order to examine the transnational heritages embedded within the broad category encompassed by the term "Latina/o" and discuss how this heritage impacts Latina/o culture specifically and the United States in general today. These texts explore a wide-range of themes, from race relations to migrant identities to gender norms, in a variety of contexts including family, education, politics, and popular culture.

This course introduces students to the nationally, linguistically, geographically, culturally, and ethnically diverse Latina/o experience in the United States through exploring Latina/o stories. Students will analyze a wide variety of cultural texts including short stories, poems, novels, films, and television in order to examine the transnational heritages embedded within the broad category encompassed by the term "Latina/o" and discuss how this heritage impacts Latina/o culture specifically and the United States in general today. These texts explore a wide-range of themes, from race relations to migrant identities to gender norms, in a variety of contexts including family, education, politics, and popular culture.

SPAN 449D – Topics in Border Studies

This course will explore Topics in Border Studies. Through the readings in this course students will develop analytical and interpretive skills and learn to apply these skills to literature and the genre both within the classroom environment and on their own. Additionally, students will achieve a nuanced understanding of the literature's social and historical context.