mziska

Image
mziska@arizona.edu
Phone
520-621-4702
Office
Harvill 151
Office Hours
Monday, 2-4 p.m., email mziska@arizona.edu for Zoom link
Monday, 4-5 p.m., Think Tank
Ziska, Marcy J
Instructor

Marcy received her Ph.D. at the University of Arizona College of Education with a minor in Spanish. Her dissertation focused on the language ideologies of college students of Spanish and the teaching and learning of Spanish in the U.S. Southwest. She received an M.A. in Spanish Literature at the University of Arizona and a B.A. at the University of California, Santa Barbara.

She has completed extensive international coursework for teachers of Spanish as a foreign language (Cursos de Formacíon de Profesores de Español para Extranjeros/ELE) at the following locations:

Instituto Mediterráneo Sol, Granada, Spain
Instituto Metzli, Tulum, Mexico
University of Guanajuato, Guanjuato, Mexico
Inhispania, Madrid, Spain
Academia Iria Flavia, Santiago de Compostela, Spain
Argentina Idioma Español, Bariloche, Argentina
Instituto Chac-Mool, Cuernavaca, Mexico
Enforex, Marbella, Spain
La Academia Hispanoamericana, San Miguel de Allende, Mexico

Marcy has conducted several workshops and talks including “Building Communities in the ‘Live Online’ Classroom”, Language Learning Community Workshop (LLC) series, “Emergent Spanish Literacy in Post-Secondary Spanish Language Students”, “Understanding and Engaging Gen Z Students in the Classroom.” She was selected for the “Fall Teaching Reflections and Models” video series for the Office of Instruction and Assessment (OIA) and was nominated by her peers for the award of “Best new research that propels the field in new directions” at the Second Language Acquisition and Teaching (SLAT) roundtable conference. She has also piloted several first and second Spanish semester textbook and course materials.

Her publications include:
“La visión exótica del mundo indígena en Hombres de maíz de Miguel Ángel Asturias.” Divergencias Revista de Estudios Lingüisticos y Literarios 10, AZ: University of Arizona, (2012). Web.

"Embodied cognition y el análisis de la construcción del ser en Segismundo: Una mirada contemporánea a La vida es sueño de Calderón." Divergencias Revista de Estudios Lingüisticos y Literarios 11, AZ: University of Arizona, (2013). Web.

Currently Teaching

SPAN 201 – Third Semester Spanish

Continuation of Spanish 101 and 102 or by placement exam. As the first semester of the second year Spanish, this course focuses on a short review of the materials studied in the first year courses. It expands on those points with a more in-depth study of the Spanish language and culture. Content-based approach integrates grammar and culture in a functional use through listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The course further develops grammatical accuracy in the use of the simple tenses: present, future, and conditional and of particular importance is the perfection of the use of the past tense: preterit and imperfect. Compound tenses such as the present perfect, past perfect are also developed in this course. Students gain the ability during this course to deal with more complex and abstract situations in the foreign language. Language use encouraged by way of communicative activities rather than a sequence of linguistics units. Audio, video, and computer materials incorporated.

Continuation of Spanish 101 and 102 or by placement exam. As the first semester of the second year Spanish, this course focuses on a short review of the materials studied in the first year courses. It expands on those points with a more in-depth study of the Spanish language and culture. Content-based approach integrates grammar and culture in a functional use through listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The course further develops grammatical accuracy in the use of the simple tenses: present, future, and conditional and of particular importance is the perfection of the use of the past tense: preterit and imperfect. Compound tenses such as the present perfect, past perfect are also developed in this course. Students gain the ability during this course to deal with more complex and abstract situations in the foreign language. Language use encouraged by way of communicative activities rather than a sequence of linguistics units. Audio, video, and computer materials incorporated.